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Moringa Oleifera - Medicinal Usage

Moringa Oleifera Leaves Medicinal uses:

This medicinal usage information is based on the article published at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, by Jed W. Fahey, Sc.D.

 

Antimicrobial / Biocidal Bacterial
Infection
Urinary Tract Infection
Viral
Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)
Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1)
HIV-AIDS
Parasites
Helminths
Trypanosomes
Other / Not Attributed to a Specific
Bronchitis
External Sores/Ulcers
Fever
Hepatic
Fever
Cancer Therapy / Protection Anti-tumor
Prostate
Radioprotective
Circulatory/Endocrine Disorders Anti-anemic
Anti-hypertensive
Cardiotonic
Diabetes/hypoglycemia
Diuretic
Hypocholestemia
Thyroid
Hepatorenal
Digestive Disorders Colitis
Diarrhea
Dysentery
Ulcer / Gastritis
Inflammation Rheumatism
Edema
Nervous Disorders Headache
Reproductive Health Lactation Enhancer
Skin Disorders Antiseptic
General Disorders/Conditions Catarrh
Lactation
Hepatamegaly
Scurvy
Tonic

Moringa oleifera: A Review of the Medical Evidence for Its Nutritional, Therapeutic, and Prophylactic Properties. Part 1. By Jed W. Fahey, Sc.D. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, 725 N. Wolfe Street, 406 WBSB, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 21205-2185

Moringa Oleifera Root Medicinal Uses

This medicinal usage information is based on the article published at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, by Jed W. Fahey, Sc.D.

 

Antimicrobial / Biocidal Bacterial
Dental Caries/Toothache
Viral
Common cold
Parasites
Trypanosomes
Other / Not Attributed to a Specific
External Sores/Ulcers
Fever
Asthma  
Circulatory/Endocrine Disorders Cardiotonic
Diuretic
Hepatorenal
Digestive Disorders Diarrhea
Dysentery
Flatulence
Inflammation Rheumatism
Edema
Nervous Disorders Anti-spasmodic
Epilepsy
Hysteria
Headache
Reproductive Health Abortifacient
Aphrodisiac
Skin Disorders Astringent
Rubefacient
Vesicant
General Disorders/Conditions Gout
Hepatamegaly
Low.Back/Kidney Pain
Scurvy
Splenomegaly

Moringa oleifera: A Review of the Medical Evidence for Its Nutritional, Therapeutic, and Prophylactic Properties. Part 1. By Jed W. Fahey, Sc.D. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, 725 N. Wolfe Street, 406 WBSB, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 21205-2185

Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses:

Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae) is a highly valued plant, distributed in many countries of the tropics and subtropics. It has an impressive range of medicinal uses with high nutritional value. Different parts of this plant contain a profile of important minerals, and are a good source of protein, vitamins, beta-carotene, amino acids and various phenolics. The Moringa plant provides a rich and rare combination of zeatin, quercetin, beta-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid and kaempferol. In addition to its compelling water purifying powers and high nutritional value, M. oleifera is very important for its medicinal value. Various parts of this plant such as the leaves, roots, seed, bark, fruit, flowers and immature pods act as cardiac and circulatory stimulants, possess antitumor, antipyretic, antiepileptic, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, antispasmodic, diuretic, antihypertensive, cholesterol lowering, antioxidant, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, antibacterial and antifungal activities, and are being employed for the treatment of different ailments in the indigenous system of medicine, particularly in South Asia. This review focuses on the detailed phytochemical composition, medicinal uses, along with pharmacological properties of different parts of this multipurpose tree.

Moringa oleifera Seeds with Potential to Relieve Pain and Inflammation:

Moringa oleifera Lam. is a perennial multipurpose tree that has been successfully used in folk medicine to cure several inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize a chitin-binding protein from Moringa oleifera seeds, named Mo-CBP(4), and evaluate its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. The protein was purified by affinity chromatography on chitin followed by ion exchange chromatography. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions assay was used for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity assessments. Mo-CBP(4) is a glycoprotein (2.9% neutral carbohydrate) composed of two protein subunits with apparent molecular masses of 28 and 18 kDa (9 kDa in the presence of reducing agent). The intraperitoneal injection of Mo-CBP(4) (3.5 and 10 mg/kg) into mice 60 min before acetic acid administration potently and significantly reduced the occurrence of abdominal writhing in a dose dependent manner by 44.7% and 100%, respectively. In addition, the oral administration of the protein (10 mg/kg) resulted in 18% and 52.8% reductions in abdominal writhing when given 30 and 60 min prior to acetic acid administration, respectively. Mo-CBP(4), when administered by intraperitoneal route, also caused a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of peritoneal capillary permeability induced by acid acetic and significantly inhibited leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavity. In conclusion, this pioneering study describes that the chitin-binding protein Mo-CBP(4), from M. oleifera seeds, exhibits anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties and scientifically supports the use of this multipurpose tree in folk medicine.

Effect of fruits of Moringa oleifera on the lipid (Fat) :

Moringa oleifera and lovastatin were found to lower the serum cholesterol, phospholipid, triglyceride, VLDL, LDL, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio and atherogenic index, but were found to increase the HDL ratio (HDL/HDL-total cholesterol) as compared to the corresponding control groups. Treatment with M. oleifera or lovastatin in normal rabbits decreased the HDL levels. However, HDL levels were significantly increased or decreased in M. oleifera- or lovastatin-treated hypercholesterolaemic rabbits, respectively. Lovastatin- or M. oleifera-treated hypercholesterolaemic rabbits showed decrease in lipid profile of liver, heart and aorta while similar treatment of normal animals did not produce significant reduction in heart. Moringa oleifera was found to increase the excretion of faecal cholesterol. Thus, the study demonstrates that M. oleifera possesses a hypolipidaemic effect.


 

 

      

Moringa Oleifera

How we process Moringa Leaf?

Moringa - chemical components

 

 

 

           

 
 
 
 
                                            

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